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Posts Tagged ‘Fremont Main Library’

Puzzled by your new iPad, smart phone, Windows 8, and more? What about Facebook, Twitter, or Skype? Our local teens, known as digital natives, can help. After all, they grew up with these devices and what they can do.

Our local teens will be back at the Fremont Main Library, starting Saturday, September 27, 2014, to help folks with questions. Drop in any time from 10:30 ‒ 12:30 p.m. Tutoring will continue through November 15, 2014.

If you have specific questions about a device or smart phone, it would be helpful to bring your manual.

Last summer our teens helped folks with questions about viruses, Skype, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, email, Facebook, and more.

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Picture1Please join us for this workshop/talk about happiness. In this fun, interactive, and lighthearted talk, Javy W. Galindo explains how happiness need not be pursued, but chosen. Galindo shares seven insights from his new book “Authentic Happiness in Seven Emails” on how to choose happiness and why it is often a difficult choice to make.

Jay W. Galindo is lecturer in John F Kennedy University and De Anza College.

 

 Date: Saturday October 25, 2014  Picture2

 Time: 3-4:30 p.m.

 Place: Fukaya Room

           Fremont Library

           2400 Stevenson Blvd

           Fremont, CA 94538

Copies of the book will be available for purchase.

Books on happiness @ library

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The two movies lined up for free showings at the Library this month will take viewers to Washington D.C.  Showtime is 2 p.m. movies rotator The movies are:

 July 6      Being There (Peter Sellers, Shirley MacLaine; PG)

July 20     National Treasure (Nicolas Cage; PG)

The Fremont Main Library, a branch of the Alameda County Library system, is located at 2400 Stevenson Boulevard and is wheelchair accessible.  Please call 510-745-1401 for more information.

 

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Come and find out from representatives of the Alameda County Water District.  Learn about the water shortage, current mandatory water use restrictions water drop and ACWD conservation programs.

The library is wheelchair accessible. An ASL interpreter will be provided for this program if requested at least 7 days in advance. Voice 510-745-1401 or TDD (888)663-0660.

Monday, June 23, 6-7:30 p.m., Fremont Main Library Fukaya Meeting Room

 

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In honor of Sunday movies rotatorFather’s Day, the Sunday movies in June at the Fremont Main Library will feature fathers and fatherhood.  Showtime is 2 p.m.  Scheduled for showing are:

June 1          Father of the Bride (Steve Martin, PG)

June 8          John Q (Denzel Washington, PG-13)

June 15        Big Fish (Albert Finney, Ewan McGregor, PG-13)

June 22        Warrior (Nick Nolte, Tom Hardy, PG-13)

June 29        Martian Child (John Cusack, PG)

Please call 510-745-1401 for more information.

 

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Frida Kahlo

Frida Kahlo

Artist Frida Kahlo is famous for doing self-portraits—she told the story of her life in oil paintings. Born in Coyoacan, Mexico in 1907, Kahlo endured much pain in her life—she contracted polio at the age of 6, and in 1925, was in an accident where the bus she was riding ran into a trolley car. The injuries from that accident lasted a lifetime, and were reflected in her work. Kahlo started painting while recovering, and gave up the study of medicine: “I paint myself because I am so often alone and because I am the subject I know best.” She painted her first self-portrait in 1926, and went on to do 55 very personal self-portraits. Some say painting helped her deal with the tragedy and pain in her personal life (she was married to muralist Diego Rivera twice), as a form of therapy.

Frida Kahlo died in 1954 at the age of 47, but will live forever in her paintings.

For further reading:

Frida Kahlo (2003), by John Morrison

DVD:

Frida Kahlo (c2006)

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Relaxation techniques are a great way to help with stress management. Relaxation isn’t just about peace of mind or enjoying a hobby. Relaxation is a process that decreases the effects of stress on your mind and body.

There are several main types of relaxation techniques, including:

  • Autogenic relaxation. Autogenic means something that comes from within you. In this relaxation technique, you use both visual imagery and body awareness to reduce stress. You repeat words or suggestions in your mind to relax and reduce muscle tension. For example, you may imagine a peaceful setting and then focus on controlled, relaxing breathing, slowing your heart rate, or feeling different physical sensations, such as relaxing each arm or leg one by one.
  • Progressive muscle relaxation. In this relaxation technique, you focus on slowly tensing and then relaxing each muscle group. This helps you focus on the difference between muscle tension and relaxation. You become more aware of physical sensations. One method of progressive muscle relaxation is to start by tensing and relaxing the muscles in your toes and progressively working your way up to your neck and head. You can also start with your head and neck and work down to your toes. Tense your muscles for at least five seconds and then relax for 30 seconds, and repeat.
  • Visualization. In this relaxation technique, you form mental images to take a visual journey to a peaceful, calming place or situation. During visualization, try to use as many senses as you can, including smell, sight, sound and touch. If you imagine relaxing at the ocean, for instance, think about such things as the smell of salt water, the sound of crashing waves and the warmth of the sun on your body. You may want to close your eyes, sit in a quiet spot and loosen any tight clothing.

Remember that relaxation techniques are skills. And as with any skill, your ability to relax improves with practice. Be patient with yourself — don’t let your effort to practice relaxation techniques become yet another stressor. Excerps from Mayo clinic  

Is there anything I should watch out for?

Relaxation techniques are considered very safe. There have been unusual cases where people become more, rather than less, anxious when using the techniques because of a heightened awareness of body sensations. Even more rare are reports of pain, heart palpitations, muscle twitching, and crying spells associated with the use of relaxation techniques. When this happens, it is often related to the process of relaxing and reflecting inward such that emotions become very poignant.

Experts advise people with schizophrenia and other forms of psychosis (thought disorders that distort reality) to avoid relaxation techniques. Excerpt from University of Maryland Medical Center

Relaxation materials @ Library

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FBI program7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 28, Fukaya A Room, Fremont Main Library

Here is your chance to find out anything you’ve been curious about the Federal Bureau of Investigation.  Come and ask FBI representatives about identity protection, fraud prevention, cyber safety awareness, things you’d like to know about the FBI and how it operates.  The program starts at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, January 28, in the Fukaya A Room of the Fremont Main Library.  The library is wheelchair accessible.  An ASL interpreter will be provided for this program if requested at least seven days in advance.  Contact voice 510-745-1401 or TDD 888-663-0660.

 

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Free 15-minute consultations with an attorney will again be available the scalefourth Tuesday of each month January through November.  Sign up in person at the Information Desk starting at 5 p.m. until 5:45 p.m. on the day of the program:

January 28            February 25            March 25

April 22                  May 27                 June 24

July 22                  August 26              September 23

October 28           November 5           December-no program

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Decades ago, in another century and in another country, I had to take mango languagesSpanish language classes in school.  Ostensibly this was to enable us, members of younger generations, to appreciate the country’s history and literature.  Critics, however, saw this as a continuing reminder that Spain had ruled the Philippines for 400 years and kept the natives in the dark, maintaining educational institutions solely to benefit the peninsulares and the insulares–Spaniards from the mainland who lived in the new colonies and the full-blooded Spaniards born on the islands.  With typical youthful shortsightedness, I saw my Spanish classes only as requirements to meet in order to graduate high school, then college.   Since then, here as an adult in our diverse community, I have been taking lessons off and on, trying to learn the language.

I do remember some things of my college Spanish classes.  One professor, pronunciatorin particular, required the class to memorize sayings, and for our final exam we had to write down as many of those observations on life that we could remember.  Two adages have stayed with me all these years:

El que se pica, ajos come.   I admit I have used or been reminded of this saying at times, especially on occasions that prompted thoughts of “if the shoe fits…”  as well as “serves you right.”  After all, he who feels the sting most likely bit into the garlic, right?

Hay que darle tiempo al tiempo.  This one appears to be meant for anyone expecting something.  Researchers perhaps?  In this age of instant gratification, one is told to be patient, to wait and to allow things to happen in due time.  Be that as it may, I say now is the time to wish one and all:  Feliz Navidad, prospero año y felicidad!

Explore the Library’s language learning resources.

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